Archive for November, 2010


Everybody loves a good joke. The surest way to a man’s heart (woman’s included, I hope) is through telling him a good joke. It removes all his preoccupations, addictions, obsessions, worries and anxieties for a moment and loosens himself up and makes him receptive to different viewpoints and perceptions. The laughter engendered by a good joke is akin to a good sneeze, it opens up all blocks in our minds and perceptions . It relaxes us. Freud wrote a whole book on it named Jokes and Their Relations to the Unconscious. Previously kings and emperors used to employ court jesters whose job was to make the king and courtiers laugh by telling intelligent and good jokes. To create a good joke is nothing short of an art. People who are proficient in it are always in demand at parties, functions and social meetings and gatherings. Many interviewees and job seekers have got their jobs on the strength of making the interviewers and prospective employers laugh on their jokes. Telling a good joke and carrying it through lightly but deftly to the end till the punch lines are delivered, with meaningful silences and significant pauses in between, involves not a small amount of intelligence and correct reading of other’s mind and the situation at hand. Timing is highly important here. Only highly intelligent ones pull it through successfully to everyone’s satisfactions while many others fall flat with a feeling of having eaten grass. The intelligence to know when to joke and when not to joke and with whom to joke and with whom not to joke is also extremely important.

Osho was such a genius story teller and especially of stories involving superb jokes. He used to intersperse his lectures with intelligent and good jokes. I don’t think he ever made any false moves while telling a joke. Consequently none of his jokes failed flat. His storytelling left nothing to be desired. He used to jocularly tell that whenever he saw the attention of anyone of his audience wander off or interest flagging off or anybody beginning to drowse he thought it was time to tell a story or a joke. Immediately it used to produce the desired effect of rousing the audience to new enthusiasm and vigour. According to him when someone laughed on a good joke he used that moment to enter into the person through his laughing and open mouth to descend into his heart to make his deep lasting impact. Osho actually produced that deep impact on his listeners or readers. I am one such reader and listener of Osho’s jokes who has experienced this deep and lasting impact. One such joke I am going to tell here to demonstrate his superb choice of good jokes. In his lifetime he had told hundreds of such jokes. In my humble opinion he probably holds the world record for telling so many first class jokes. If for nothing else, he will be remembered for his jokes for ever. To select one is a difficult task where plenty demand to be chosen. But I have to pick one. I have chosen this one. I don’t know in which of his 200 published books this joke appeared. During my decade long reading of his books and listening to his thousands of tapes I have lost the name of the book from which I had read it. I don’t know if this joke has been collected into his volumes of collected jokes. As a result I don’t have the book in front of me to copy from nor the tape to transcribe. So I have to recollect it from memory, to replicate it as I had read it almost a decade back. It is also in the fitness of things here to demonstrate how deep an impact Osho created in his readers and listeners. Without any more ado, here is the story that goes like this :

Mullah Nasruddin ( Osho told many of his wonderful jokes through this character) was going on his first foreign travel to England. He had got all his things like passport, visa, hotel bookings, foreign currency requirements etc. arranged to his satisfaction. He left his mother with his younger brother who resided in the same town as he lived. Only one thing troubled him to no end. He had a cat and he was extremely fond of that. He was toying with options about with whom he could leave the cat safely behind. He found none satisfying enough. So at last he left the cat with his brother but not without a great deal of lecture to him regarding the cat’s feeding schedules, its favorite foods and drinks and sleeping arrangements. Now with a less burdened heart he drove to the airport, boarded his plane for London.

While the plane was just about to land in Heathrow airport, he got a call. His brother was on the other end. Mullah said hello and straightaway asked the question “ How is the cat ?” After just a small pause his brother replied, ” The cat is dead.” Suddenly the mullah turned pale and he thought a heart attack might be just round the corner. Thereafter how he got off the plane, how he was picked up by the travel agency car, how he reached his room at the hotel, all became just a blur in his memory. He was there but not present anywhere. About a couple of hours thereafter, somehow a little rested and pacified in his hotel room, he dialed his brother. “Hello”, said his brother.
Mullah said, ” You are a fool. You were a fool in your childhood and you have kept it up till now.”
His brother replied, ” What have I done ?”
Mullah said, ” What was the use of telling the death of the cat like that ? You told it at one go, couldn’t you have told it some other way ? I could have died in a heart attack or due to severe shock ! You don’t know how close I was to death because of your foolishness.”
His brother asked, ” please tell me how else could I have told that ?”
Mullah replied, ” You could have told it part by part, installment by installment at a time. For instance, At first you could have told that the cat was playing on the roof. On a subsequent call you could have said that he fell from the roof while playing but there was only a slight lameness in his hind legs. The vat was seeing him, he will be o.k.”
His brother protested, ” how could I have reported a dead cat as a slightly lame cat ? Thereafter how would I have ended the story ? Tell me that also.”
Mullah replied, ” Thereafter on my next call you could have reported another installment. That in spite of all attention and care the cat has worsened. He was not taking any food. By that I would have found time for preparing myself to receive the ultimate and the worst news of his death after a few such installments. I would not have got such a nasty shock. Don’t commit such foolishness again with anybody else.”
Mullah wiped his face and asked his brother, “Now tell me, how is mother ?”

His brother paused a little and replied, ” Mother is playing on the roof.”

The joke ends here.
But my fascination with jokes continues. Hope yours too.

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Maa Sarada

once so near and afterwards so far nephew Hriday,supporting Ramakrishna in trance

John F. Kennedy, possibly in a moment of male bravado, confided to one of his friends “I have never been through a woman unless I have had her in three ways.” Not an unusual bravado. It is typical male ego showing its prowess, attractiveness and success. Only difference is that it has a shock value as it came from one of the most popular Presidents of the United States of America. Very few successful and not so successful men are strangers to this emotion. It is a truth, almost universally observed and acknowledged that women tend to flock around successful men. So by a little twist of logic some men claim that they have had it with so many women in their life to prove their virility, attractiveness and success. Success has its own attractions. Some call it as the ultimate aphrodisiac. I have neither quarrels with the successful men nor with their getting attention from all the attractive and nubile women crowding around them. Rather I have a feeling that it should be so. Women have to think of housing, food, money etc. for themselves and their yet unborn children. They are more rooted in the reality of the world unlike men who have their feet mostly off the ground and up in the sky; mostly their personal sky. What I have objection to is Kennedy’s use as well as many others’ use of the phrase or sentence, “I have had her.” I object because it is a lie. You cannot “have had” a woman. You can attract her to you by your success, wealth and power, you can have sex with her, you can even be in a relationship with her but you cannot “have had’ her at any stage, least of all when you are through with her, doesn’t matter in how many number of ways.

When you are successful and rich you tend to tick women off. After sleeping with someone for some nights you say “ oh, I have had her” and you tick her off and move on to your next trophy, target, prey, victim whatever you say. Then after a few days with her you tick her off “oh, look at her, I have had her.” Then the next one. So it goes on and you reach a tally of say one hundred. My point is that yes, you have had sex with one hundred women but you have not had even one of them. That is not the way to ‘have had’ them. I would rather say they ‘have had’ you in the sense you employ the phrase.

I know of one person only who actually ‘has had’ a woman. Not in the sense you employ the phrase but in its real, true sense. He was SriRamakrishna Paramhansa. He had a wonderful wife in Sarada Devi. Millions call her as Maa Sarada. The first to call her so was none other than Ramakrishna himself. He could see the divine feminine in her. In fact, the entire womankind was only mother to him. The Goddess Kali he was worshipping daily in the temple was, to him, manifested in Sarada. He could not have sex with her. How could one have sex with one’s mother ? Instead, he worshipped her, to the astonishment of the girl –wife who was just eighteen then. She must have been like all other girls of her age, having altogether different pictures of conjugal life in her mind. But she had the intelligence to understand very soon that her husband was not like any other man. In the one-room living room in the temple premises allotted to Ramakrishna they slept like brother and sister, separately. This wife was ready to serve her husband as he wished. Ramakrishna knew that. Yet not for once he could see her in any other way than the Goddess Kali, the divine feminine herself. It became his duty to remind her of her real Self, not by lecturing her or by arguing with her but by revering her as he revered the idol of Goddess Kali. Not even a little bit differently. If he had been something in his words and something else in his actions he wouldn’t have been believed. How could you hoodwink your wife, who was certainly privy to all your lusts, even your lustful thoughts. She was always at hand, she would be the first to notice any discrepancy in his thoughts, words and actions. Because she found none she began to believe in him and moulded herself accordingly. By concentration, meditation and most of all her absolute devotion to Ramakrishna and tending selflessly to all his needs and by devotion to the Goddess Kali Herself she realized her trueself, her real nature. Ramakrishna was there to guide her in every step. But that was a unique relationship, unlike any thing I have seen and known.

She was almost eighteen years younger, they had married while she was five and he was twenty three. After the marriage they lived apart till she turned eighteen when she took the matter to her hand one day and decided to be united with her husband at Calcutta. How she set out for the journey from her village and how she reached the destination is an enthralling story by itself and Ramakrishna knew nothing of her plan. But when she finally reached him he was overjoyed to find her, almost surprising everyone including her. All her apprehensions were dispelled off. It is no less a mystery than his choosing her as his consort when she was just a child of five. What he found in that child of five will remain a mystery forever. But on this reunion after thirteen years of their marriage he was all joy and celebration for her. She was eighteen years younger, but he treated her as more than his equal. All her requests were heeded without fail. No woman had ever got a more devoted, more obedient and a more loving husband. His loyalty to her was one hundred per cent. I have a strong hunch that this kind of unquestioning devotion, reverence, respect, honour to her along with his devotion to the mother Goddess Kali finally left no doubt in her mind as to the role she was cut out to play in the future. Certainly that accounted for his resounding success in ‘having had’ her too. How else could anybody aspire to ‘have had’ a woman other than through love and deep respect, through kindness and understanding and by completely honouring her as Ramakrishna used to honour Sarada ? Ramakrishna not only never disrespected her but also wouldn’t allow anybody to do so. If he noticed anybody doing so, he had a very touching way of warning the offender. I am giving an example.

Ramakrishna had a nephew named Hriday living with him who used to help Sarada in her kitchen and in other household and religious work. He was also attending to Ramakrishna. On his outings too he used to accompany him as Ramakrishna was highly prone to elapse into Samadhi or trance like state at any moment of time if God’s name was sung anywhere around him. The nephew, in course of time, like any other ordinary man in his place, began to throw his weight around as he had some high ideas about himself and his capabilities. He thought of himself as indispensable as Ramakrishna was not even able to take care of himself due to his extremely sensitive and devout nature. Ramakrishna never touched money in his life. When money was kept under his bed to test him, without his knowledge, he could not sleep till the offending object was removed. The nephew began to disobey him and sometimes even dared to speak sharp, hurtful and impudent words to him in his face. Ramakrishna never protested such behavior. He tolerated them all. But when he saw the same kind of treatment meted out to Sarada he couldn’t take it any more. He warned Hriday in a very touching way. He said, ” you disobeyed me, misbehaved with me so many times yet I never said anything. But she is different. She is the Goddess herself. If she is hurt by your behavior, untold miseries will follow you. Then none can save you. Don’t tell me then that I hadn’t warned you.” But ordinary man that the nephew was he took no heed as he didn’t believe that a cooking, cleaning , not very well read and an ordinary woman could be anything other than what she appeared to him. He persisted in his obnoxious, arrogant behavior towards her. But not for long. Situations and events took such a turn that the nephew had to leave the place for good without Ramakrishna having to do anything. Later on the nephew realized that he was actually not indispensable and repented and wept to be taken back but none of these acts even got reported to Ramakrishna. Such was his fate that the man who was always beside Ramakrishna for many years had to beg his disciples to have an audience with him but it was never granted. Ramakrishna was completely unaware of these happenings. His warning proved one hundred percent true. There are many such examples to be read from the biography of Ramakrishna or Mother Sarada. Ramakrishna would tolerate everything but he had the least tolerance towards dishonor or disrespect to women. Here lies the root of the story of my fascination with Ramakrishna.

From my childhood Ramakrishna became a hero to me for this unique quality. He revered each woman as a Goddess in herself. Every woman was like his own mother. This feeling was so much developed in him that he could never bring himself to consummate his own marriage.

I know we cannot be like him. Sex is movement of energy in us. It carries so much charge, so much power that it holds us in its thrall and demands expression and searches for outlet. The resolutiuon of tension so engendered becomes one of the prime activities of all animals, birds, insects or reptiles. No individual is untouched by it. The sexual urge is purely biological and elemental. Mother Nature ensures the survival and continuation of most of its children through reproduction by sexual mating. Sexual mating again causes formation of bonding which ensures better chance of survival of the species wherein the offspring get two parents in place of one for succor and protection.

So wherein this scenario or set up Ramakrishna fits in ? What is his relevance in a world governed by sex ? What is this bull doing in a china shop ? Sorry, what is this asexual saints’s relevance for us who have begun to believe or have taken for granted that being called sexy amounts to being called beautiful, desirable and even spiritual ? I think he has great relevance for us. The people who have actively fought a prolonged war are the ones who really seek peace, as they have suffered the horrors of war, they have seen the war in its true colors. They are the ones who never glorify war. Instead they want peace.

Similarly, those who have seen how sex has undone so many by leading people by the garden path, promising so many sweet dreams of happiness, joy, love and bliss but actually ending by falling flat on the ground with a sense of having been cheated or having eaten grass. Sex is purely biological, but some still think and say that it is spiritual too. I say, if it is spiritual in the sense that it can be used for God realization then electricity is spiritual too as it is used by meditators to keep the meditation hall cool or warm as the case may be or for using it for lighting, microphone, cooking etc. Osho, also advocated throughout his life that sex was spiritual too. I have spent a decade of my life reading his books and listening to his tapes and I have come to the conclusion that it may be true for him or for a very few gifted individuals only. But for the vast majority it is a mirage. Realising God through sex is a mirage. Tantra in India almost got wiped out of the land of its birth due to, among many other reasons, this dabbling with sex as a means of God realization. Ultimately at the end of your search nothing comes to your hand. You are empty as before only now you are more confused, more disillusioned. Osho too like Ramakrishna was a great respecter of women. He had a woman at the head in each department of his Ashram. But he had to pay a very great price for espousing this path of God realization through sex. Of course, Osho will survive because sex is just one of his flavours, he was a many flavoured, many dimensional man. But here I am digressing.

Ramakrishna showed how by revering and honoring the Divine Mother, the Divine Feminine within each woman we see, we can seek Her, please Her to let us show Her splendor, Her real Self, which many mystics have said to be Love. She could be known only with Her mercy, if She lets you show Herself. Devotion to Her is the only way. She is the repository of all knowledge. By Her grace only you can be the knower of all that knowledge, including the knowledge of knowing Her. According to Ramakrishna,” The Mother is fierce to the evil doers but She is infinitely compassionate and kind to Her children who take refuge in Her”. So surrendering to the Divine Feminine is the way to peace, prosperity, joy, grace and wisdom.
Ramakrishna “has had” certainly one woman and probably many women in his life without even touching any of them. Both Ramakrishna and John F.Kennedy died very early in their life, to be precise a little before they turned fifty. Ramakrishna died of cancer and Kennedy by a bullet. Both were survived by their widows for more than thirty years. I am struck by many resemblances in their lives but they differ widely in the way they viewed women. In fact, very few viewed women the way Ramakrishna did. And what a great difference it made! Sarada, after eastern tradition, never thought of remarrying. In life she served her husband as a mother took care of her son and after his death his grateful, devoted and gifted disciples rallied round her, saw to her comforts, took her guidance in furthering the causes most dear to her husband’s heart and above all continued to revere her as The Mother.

Thus she became an example of what great faith could do to change an ordinary mortal into a power house of courage, confidence and wisdom. I am beholden to Ramakrishna for altering so many lives in the direction of their fulfillment and self realization. He certainly knew how to ‘have had’ others.

When I look back on the time I have spent in Facebook during the last 200 days in which I have been an active member, something very remarkable stand out in my experiences which I think fit worthy to share among friends. First, Facebook shattered some beliefs and myths which I had long since held in mind as a result of being born to a particular country and religion. From the childhood it had been dinned into my ears that Hinduism is the most scientific and spiritual among all religions and it is only the fortune of the very meritorious ones to take birth in India, even the gods envy them. That was the myth no.1. My friends in Facebook demolished the myth from my mind by showing how, though belonging to an alien faith like Christianity, they have mastered the concepts like Vedantic Non-dualism or Oneness so thoroughly as to shame any of us Indians. When Karen Richards writes a post on Non-dualism and fifteen or twenty friends of various faiths and countries take part in a discussion that ensues, I follow the lofty thoughts spellbound by the mastery and knowledge of the participants and very often wonder if I was suddenly transported in a Time machine to a deliberation of Upanishadic Rishis on their pet themes of the Supreme Self and Oneness of all.

Facebook demolished another unexamined but widely held belief to which I too was an adherent in no small measure due to my upbringing in a society where this sort of beliefs were just in the air to be picked up. This is my myth no.2 which Facebook demolished very decisively for good. That women are good only if kept inside the homes for raising children and doing household chores and loving their menfolks. Intellectually they are no match for men, so nothing intellectual can be expected of them. But, my experiences and encounters here  with women of the west were eye openers, to say the least. Just one chat with Julia Day was enough to convince me the hollowness of the myth. By the time our chat ended I was left wondering whether a woman could be so understanding, wise, witty and empathetic. I felt so inadequate to the level of maturity, wisdom, empathy and broadness of mind and vision demonstrated time and again by many gifted women who frequent Facebook and adorn its pages. If I name them here their names will run to pages. It convinced me that the west is rich and prosperous not because it exploited the third world countries, another myth so widely held, but because it has such great women in it. After coming to honour them I began to see the greatness, though not as distinctly and abundantly found as in the western women, of Indian women too though much caged,confined and conditioned by a country subjugated for centuries under foreign invaders who did very little for their education. Chatting with Indian women, as a result, has been an ordeal for me. You don’t know what is going to offend them, such low is their tolerance level and their sensitivity to anything remotely personal. Once I asked an Indian woman who has been in America for the last 15 years regarding the name of the place in India where she came from and immediately I was defriended. Another married woman of my country sought me out for a chat and within minutes I was defriended for asking what her husband did for a living. Since then I accept invitation for chat from Indian women not without a considerable amount of trepidation and fear. I hate defriending anyone or being defriended by anyone. It has been my experience that the more educated and wise you are the less easily you get offended by others or the less egoistic you are. Our women need more education to be on par with their western counterparts.

My time in Facebook also erased a myth, let me call it myth no.3, which was also a fear, from my mind for ever. That internet in general and Facebook in particular, is a den of vices, pornography and purveyor of values that destroy family and relationships. My experience here is a testament to the contrary; that Facebook is a wonderful platform for sharing spiritual thoughts, ideas and experiences. It is a wonderful place where you can pick and choose like minded people who are like you. My friends here almost always raise my morale, show me more clearly the reality and the truth about myself. It is one of them who convinced me that what I call myself is only 2% physical and 98% spiritual; so I am a spiritual being in essence. The way to realise that is through feeling the radiance of the Self, being silent and being at peace with every one and every thing.

For all these I shall remain ever grateful to my friends here, numbering 1581 till date and increasing by day, and Facebook for being the wonderful platform it has been. It is almost like the Ocean of Wisdom here, but I have been able to drink only limitedly as my capacity for profiting from it was too limited.

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    •  

      Pudugram Vaidyanathan Thank you for such a wonderful analysis of the merits of Fb and for sharing your own inner thoughts and truths. 

      July 24 at 12:17pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Alan Jacobs yes thank you for such a well written appreciation and critique of the Internet and FB from a spiritual standpoint. Like most attractions if used wisely it can be a great enhancement to one’s spiritual understanding-or else a risky addiction. 

      July 24 at 12:22pm · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Lori Schwegel 

      That is just fabulous Paresh..I remember the first note I shared with you..(please give Eastern Indian women a chance to see what you see) It takes a while to feel comfortable to speak as it goes all over the world. Every word you say goes …See More
      July 24 at 12:35pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Shira Lee Much gratitude for your open – hearted sharings Paresh. Each experience appears to be an outpouring of our own consciousness. Each friend a reflection.Ultimately the “connection” is always within.
      Thank you! 

      July 24 at 12:41pm · Like ·  1 person
    •  

      Ariel Bravy Wow Paresh, so beautifully written… Thank you. 🙂 

      July 24 at 12:41pm · Like ·  1 person
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      Ishvari Lockhart an Indian girl friend of mine told me once the Dalai Lama said ‘western women are going to save the world’..!…in what way I asked? No-One Knows…OM !♥ 

      July 24 at 2:21pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Julia Day I Love You Brother ♥ Thank you for the privilege of Joining in this One Heart as One 😉 

      July 24 at 2:43pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Henriette van Staal howe great is your inspiration,in the west women are more free to speak out there inner feelings and the are not hold in a tradition.thank you fore your bautiful note. 

      July 24 at 2:48pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Alyce Walker 

      I thank you for your sharing and honoring, Paresh. Beautifully stated, with deep empathy, understanding and sensitivity. I’m so grateful for you being so open to revealing your truth and experiences, especially around women and the feminine…See More
      July 24 at 3:29pm via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Irene Rhodes Very lovely note Paresh. Thank you. :0) 

      July 24 at 3:30pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Anthony Amrhein 

      You touched on some very wonderful insights. Regarding women, and their supressionin some countries and less suppression in others, the countries with less suppression seem to do better. I see this is true outwardly. There needs to be a dee…See More
      July 24 at 5:16pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Carolyn Wind thank you, dear friend…yes…self experiencing what it believed was ‘other’ only to recognize it’s very own Heart…♥ thank you! 

      July 24 at 7:27pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Steven Steensels How many of us can say they got rid of at least three myths during the last two hundred days ? What a beautiful testimony, Paresh ! As from now, I see you as a brilliant comet moving fast into the boundless space which is our all home. Thank you for this honest recount, my friend. You write wonderfully well. 

      July 24 at 7:47pm · Unlike ·  6 people
    •  

      Cathy Ginter Beautiful sharing ~ so many blessings 

      July 24 at 8:02pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Martin Goldstein Thank you for sharing. 

      July 24 at 8:10pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Beatriz Dantzler Thank you for the tag, sweet Paresh! Beautifully genuine note! ♥ 

      July 24 at 8:24pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Tom Clausen grateful thank you for expressing so many things so beautifully and kindredly wonderful. 🙂 

      July 24 at 9:12pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Carmen Pentek 

      Interesting, Paresh. I see you with new eyes, now.
      I knew about the differences between Western and Eastern women, many times it seems to be easier for Western women to be straight forward that for Eastern ones, I observed. Here, the convent…See More
      July 24 at 9:14pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Adriana Hill And so, of course I could not help but cry my friend. I knew your writing was this powerful. You will do great and remarkable things. It is my intention to travel to your world and be with the women there. Change for them will come in a very different way. There is room enough for everyone to grow and it is all so beautiful and breathtaking to behold. I stand in awe and bow deeply.. 

      July 24 at 9:15pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Grace Mendoza 

      Hi Paresh,
      Felt your warmness and love as I read your note, pleasantly getting to know another part of you ………….. I totally agree with you that FB has served to open our eyes and guide us along in acknowledging our ONENESS. FB is …See More
      July 24 at 9:58pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Sheyla R Filmeridis Dearest brother ~ Dear Paresh ♥
      Such sweet invigorating transparency!! … connecting us closer in Heart.
      Thank you. 

      July 24 at 10:18pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Irene Bradle Beautifully written, my dear, sweet, wonderful friend. I feel honored to be your friend. 

      July 24 at 11:07pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Georgia Westphal 

      Facebook can be a truely wonderful tool for connecting us to others around the world, or even across the street. It has been my experience that for the most part we draw to us here, as in our daily lives, the kind of people who vibrate at…See More
      July 24 at 11:57pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Hélène Lalaire It is a Grace to know you Paresh.Awesome sharing Namaste ♥ 

      July 25 at 12:00am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Cathy Kennedy dear paresh, we are such new friends on f b . what you say is true,
      our earth is becomeing round and full from all the people all over
      shareing with each other, growing from each other. see you on
      facebook……………. lets grow 

      July 25 at 12:47am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Irene Harvey 

      paresh, this is wonderful. you have articulated what i try to tell people about facebook–that it can be an opening into the wider world. you have learned different things than i have, but all our lives here have expanded through each other…See More
      July 25 at 1:27am · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Russie Wight-Waltman very well stated Paresh. It seems facebook has opened many doors for you. As Irene said it can be an opening into a wider world, which is what I have discovered also. And as Alan said it can be a great enhancement to one’s spiritual understanding-or else a risky addiction.: ))) It does have an addictive component. 

      July 25 at 4:42am · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Valérie Mautin And like attracts like Paresh! BE it!! ♥♥♥ 

      July 25 at 6:43am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Evelyn Aung-Thwin 

      Paresh, your country does indeed have a great wealth of spiritual knowledge, and for this we are grateful.
      But it is wonderful to know that deep spirituality lives anywhere on our beloved planet. Not only that, but that we can grow and e…See More
      July 25 at 7:13am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Deniz Tekiner I very much admire Indian culture and religion and, living in the US, know that there are many problems here. But reading your fine essay leaves me thinking that I have even more blessings to count and be grateful for. 

      July 25 at 8:41am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Caryn Rich Thank you for sharing my friend… Everyone is my teacher and I am grateful for the contacts and connections I too have made… Keep learning, keep growing and stay open minded my friend, the truth is always simple….. Much ♥ 

      July 25 at 9:12am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Babina Shrestha Thank you so much Paresh ji for sharing your precious views. I am truly honored to have you as a facebook friend. Being someone coming from the same side of the world, I too have similar feelings. ♥ 

      July 25 at 9:35am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Unity Walker Paresh! Thank you for this wondeful joining and sharing! Your mindfulness of the meaning of your experience is astounding. I have just learned from you so much! Namaste, Light of God. 

      July 25 at 10:57am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Jeanne De Wet What a gift this note has been to me right now. Thank you for including me in it and for the seeing it brings. Balm for the heart! 

      July 25 at 11:07am via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Divyaa Kummar Love ly! indeed i hv learnt more from fb than any other book or text- as its experential understanding and thus wisdom that is alive! i too cam eon very reluctantly- but cheers to fb! 

      July 25 at 2:14pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Carmen Pentek 

      Paresh, a few things just don’t go out of my mind.1. Your opinion about women, that they are not equal. Does that mean that there is generally such a big gap between men and women due to different level of education? Or do you think that ti…See More 

      July 25 at 2:19pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Vincenzo Santiglia It has opened a world of possibilities for many and it will continue to do so! Thx for sharing. 

      July 25 at 2:41pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Shaila Doshi I am indeed grateful to fb, for it has brought me in touch with so many like minded people , have learnt so much from their sharings.Indeed each day brings forth something new to absorb and learn. 

      July 25 at 10:18pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Elizabeth Patrick 

      Paresh, I like to learn something new every day–and FB helps me do this. I love the discussions and different view points, the exchanging of ideas. Western women–at least in the US–have had to fight for some rights and are still not alwa…See More
      July 27 at 7:05am via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  1 person

Yesterday my wife, with a bowl of hair dye in her hand, approached and requested me to dye her hair. I said,”you know, I don’t like dying hairs myself, so I have let them be as they are. If yours are getting white you also let them be that way. Moreover, I am 55 and you are 51; we are no longer young, so why hide it, show them in their true colors.”
She said,”You are saying that because yours are still mostly black. But mine are all white. You don’t know, once you have started dying then you can’t quit it, as dying itself turns all your hairs white.”
I said, not without a little bit of mischief,”I have never seen your head in its silvery white as you always dyed them black. Do show me your white hair just once to know how you look in them. So don’t dye this time.”
What she said in reply, I will never forget.
She replied, with a kind of vehemence and forcefulness in her voice and a livening up in her appearance, “If you want to see how I look in my all white hairs, then look at my mother or your mother and imagine and visualise for yourself. But if you still want to see first hand, you will have to live till I am ninety. I assure you that after ninety I will never dye my hair.”
I saw suddenly a new aspect of her emerging before my eyes; her eternal self in which her present appearance arose for just a limited period to be again submerged in the end in ItSelf. I was flooded with emotions of evanescence of our forms and the immortality of what we are in essence. Yeats’ ‘my body like a battered kettle tied to a dog’s tail’ came poignantly to mind illustrating starkly the contrast between the eternal, undying Self and this mortal and corruptible body. My wife in her earthy and unintellectual way was probably feeling the same starkness of the contrast in her and didn’t quite like what she saw in her face, hairs and body–the ravages of Time mocking at her. In her effort to stem the rot, she was applying dyes on the surface to keep her external beauty in alignment with her sense of beauty within–a losing battle, no doubt, till she fully realised that she was Beauty, Love and Truth in essence. At that instant I was enveloped with an acute feeling of love and compassion for her on the awakening in my heart ushered in by the subtle intimations of immortality life so often and on so many occasions sends us but we fail to decipher.
I took the bowl of dye and the brush from her hand and dyed her hair as little clumsily as I could but most lovingly and mindfully.

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    •  

      Ellen Trump This is beautiful. 

      July 29 at 9:26pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Elizabeth Patrick Wonderful! We women often like to colour the gray, silver, and white in our hair–not in an effort to hold onto youth as such, but to hold the fort against what time is doing to us outwardly–lessening the outward appearance as it improves the inward. We strive to keep a balance between the two. 🙂 I grayed prematurely–a legacy from my father–and found my my first gray hair at age 16. Abet your wife in colouring her hair for as long as she wishes–it means her spirit is strong. 

      July 29 at 9:29pm via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Steven Steensels This is so well written, Paresh, I think I – for a moment – saw you seeing your beloved wife fully realising the Beauty, the Love, the Truth she is in essence.
      Thank you for this privileged moment and sharing of lucidity. 

      July 29 at 9:38pm · Unlike ·  7 people
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      Maureen Yeomans thank you for sharing that ‘seeing’; for a moment, I too ‘saw’. 

      July 29 at 9:54pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Jennifer Levine Gomez 

      This is lovely. A moment of Truth. Thank you.
      I often face this type of question… and I attempt to listen to what is speaking, rather than what is being said. It helps me to see the core issue… in this case: fear. (What else?) And…See More
      July 29 at 10:03pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Susan Welsh What a beautiful way to magnify the loving marriage,you and your wife share. To love unconditionally is to shelve your personal self awareness and beliefs. To feel love in it’s natural state; beyond judgment. Respecting your own beliefs in the same time space as others; no matter how they may contradict ♥ Thank you for sharing this story, Paresh ♥ 

      July 29 at 10:18pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Shaila Doshi Reminds me of the time when my mother-in-law ,suffering from cancer, in her last days ,had the beautician come over to wax her hands and thread her eyebrows…she wanted to look beautiful for the last part of her journey! 

      July 29 at 10:20pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Margaret Drummond So beautiful Paresh! – tears of love,joy and bliss! – ♥ 

      July 29 at 10:20pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Susan Welsh Definitely falls in the category of must share, Paresh! 

      July 29 at 10:23pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Ishvari Lockhart all the back of my hairs stood up, the stark and very raw Simpleness in Being present..Bow with ♥ ♥ 

      July 29 at 10:28pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Soniya Aurora 

      pareshji, your honesty in sharing in lucid detail the awakening of immortality of the divine love within us when we overcome n the self acceptance of the illusion of our beauty n youth. what impressed me was the unconditional love of u for …See More
      July 29 at 10:29pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Georgia Westphal 

      Regardless of what the calander says about our age we all have the immortal inside holding hands with all the ages we have been before, child, teen, young adult. I think in many ways women are more in tune with these various stages of our…See More
      July 29 at 10:43pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Elisabeth Sexton Paresh this is beautiful with understanding kindness and love and full of compassion for your loving wife!! Blessings to you. Love and Lights~ 

      July 29 at 10:58pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Anna Farrell A tender sharing -so lovely thank you Paresh 

      July 29 at 11:12pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Alan Jacobs thanks for sharing this intimate experience with a moral too. 

      July 29 at 11:53pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Tom Adams A beautiful personal sharing, my favorite kind! Thank you. 

      July 30 at 12:13am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Julia Day We see the body or Behold The Spirit ♥
      Thank you so much for beholding the Pure Spirit in your Beloved, reflecting your own, my own, our One Source as eternal perfect Love ♥ Great Gratitude ♥ 

      July 30 at 12:14am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Irene Bradle How beautiful this is! Thank you so much for sharing. What a wonderful love and caring you have for your beautiful wife. You are both blessed to have each other, my dear and thoughtful friend. 

      July 30 at 12:18am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Unity Walker I thank you for ever so lovingly and mindfully dying “our” hair for “us.” How lovely, Paresh Ji! I don’t dye my hair, andat 61, I have some gray, but still waiting for it to turn as gloriously white I as Itself wills. Many thanks for honoring my sister’s request. Namaste. 

      July 30 at 12:20am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Louise Christian Beautifully written…and experienced…:) 

      July 30 at 12:23am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Anthony Amrhein Awesome. You may have died in the dye 😉 

      July 30 at 2:26am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Susan Armaiti Zinowsky 

      What a love ly and beautiful story, dear Paresh…thank you for sharing this! I just read it to my husband and we both are really touched. You know, you are blessed with your Shakti, who wants to stay beautiful, also on the outside.. I’m su…See More
      July 30 at 2:49am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Jackie Muscoreil 

      Mine changed to a platinum white at 36…tried dying it and then one day, I said…there must be a reason that God wanted me to have this color now and not the brown. Ok…I went out shopping and many people asked me what I did to my hair t…See More
      July 30 at 3:10am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Irene Harvey 

      i love how you learn from everything, paresh. you intuitively understand the metaphorical quality of life.
      & that being said, i’m with your wife–all that talk of inner beauty is very well, but they are going to have to pry my cold, dead han…See More
      July 30 at 3:36am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Jackie Muscoreil 

      hahahahaha….with the ingredients that are now being put into our moisturizers, etc…..we will soon be calling them ‘weapons of mass destruction’ and time will not be an issue..hahahaha. When I read what is in the beauty creams that I hav…See More
      July 30 at 3:48am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Lori Schwegel A+ Paresh…you write so well..I love the story! The little things in life create a much larger understanding between us all. 

      July 30 at 3:52am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Nana Trianasari I like your story Pareshji,,,Thank you for sharing…In every corner of life, there is always opportunity for a little kindness…that means alot for those who receive.. 

      July 30 at 4:06am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Hélène Lalaire While reading you daer Paresh,came to me the lovely song…
      “I see your true colours shining through…” ♥ Blessings 

      July 30 at 4:25am · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Carmen Pentek 

      Beautiful, Paresh! Nice story-
      Also here women usually dye the hair, but it is complicated with all our different hair colors, the dye never really matches the natural color, so it is almost always a disappointment…
      I have dyed my hair as a…See More
      July 30 at 5:04am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Pudugram Vaidyanathan 

      Nice heart warming story. Yes, your are right, most of us want to be eternal youthful, alive, frozen in time. And the external mortal self is the only thing we can easily work upon and control, to some extent. It is not possible for most hu…See More
      July 30 at 6:56am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Shira Lee Blessings to You and to your Beloved….it is a gift to read this sharing. Thank you! 

      July 30 at 7:35am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Tom Clausen great feelings of seeing the heart in yourself and in your wife … lovely and very enriching… gratefully, t 

      July 30 at 8:22am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Beatriz Dantzler What a kind and loving soul you are, dear Paresh! Lovely story! What a gift to get home and find this sweet, touching and loving note on my page! Thank you sweet friend and much love to both of you, always…♥ 

      July 30 at 8:53am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Ayaka Torna Ruben I wish I had u during my growing age u would have been a pillar. Nice piece the juxtaposition of words is a thing of must mention 

      July 30 at 11:21am via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Kelli McGowan wow wow wow thank you thank you thank u 

      July 30 at 12:22pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Paula Gsell What a wonderful story, you are such a kind , loving soul, bless your heart. When I started to grey and tried to dye my hair, I found I was alergic to dyes and I was forced to be natural, at first I didn’t like it, but as time passed, I have come to love my white hair! 

      July 30 at 5:54pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Parvez J Daruwala beautiful story,,, humor blended with compassion,,, undelrlying which,,passion ! Thanks fro sharing. 

      July 30 at 7:55pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Jill Richling-Thesman Your story brought tears to my eyes. Thank you. 

      July 30 at 8:22pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Grace Mendoza Wow my friend! You are growing like crazy and she is one of your teachers in life!! You are both mirroring each other. Thanks for sharing story of “awakening” ……….. Loveyou very much! 

      July 30 at 8:55pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Nessa Boswell Thank You x 

      August 3 at 3:04am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Nana Trianasari Dear Pareshji, once again,,thank you so very much for this inspiring note..
      Love & Light,
      Nana 

      August 7 at 4:56pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Richard Kogerup I really like this Pareshiji , a heartfelt moment ! 

      August 12 at 3:50am · Unlike ·  1 person
  •  

This morning, a strange thing happened. While I was going through an otherwise excellent article by friend Pudugram Vaidyanathan on body, mind and soul; some of his words, which he remarked no doubt jocularly, jumped off the page at me and immediately I was overcome with a swarm of emotions. I am quoting those words. “I don’t know anyone whose heart dances with joy at the thought of brushing his teeth.” The fact is mine does. Every night, just before going to sleep, my heart really dances with joy at the thought of brushing my teeth. In fact, it waits for the experience in great anticipation since the early evening. But just because my heart craves for it I don’t hurry, knowing very well that everything happens in its own time and only then it has a beauty of its own. You can advance an experience like this by your hurry for it, but you rob the experience of all its joy, beauty and purity. I give myself this excellent reward of brushing my teeth for having done a good deed by waiting patiently for it or having otherwise finished a good day’s job without expecting any reward for it. So it came as a surprise to me to know that nobody else loves the job of brushing his teeth. Lest I may be accused of monopolizing or patenting on this beautiful, divinely blissful art of brushing teeth, let me narrate in some detail what this art means to me. It is a complete experience in which all my senses participate as instruments in an orchestra and partake of the feast of joy so produced. It is just not a blow job, hurriedly done, but when I connect the brush with paste to my mouth it is like consciously connecting your body with your mind with the breathing as the bridge in between. It is a kind of meditation too. But I have already jumped a step in the excitement, yes I admit I am very prone to excitement when called to describe the joy of this art of brushing teeth, so let me begin from the beginning.

First you take your brush out and have a feel of your running fingers on its bristles and sometimes as a variation you hold the brush under tap to wet it first and then run your thumb over the bristles and see how it feels when water in small particles jump off the brush and splash you in the face. Then having satisfied yourself that your brush is in good condition, you take up the paste from its stand and squeeze it gently on the brush until you get the desired amount on your brush. The sight of the oozing out and squeezed out paste; does it remind you of anything? It always reminds me of one story. It happened that one day, like every other day, a father was exhorting his son to work hard as he emphasized that nothing was impossible if one worked hard. The boy was feeling utterly worthless as he was not a hard working type. That day the boy couldn’t take any more. He rose up and went to the bath room and brought out the tube of tooth paste and squeezed it hard on his father’s palm. As a lump of toothpaste came out, he put the tube on his father’s other hand and said, “You always say nothing is impossible for hard work. Now put that paste back into the tube.”

Now you mindfully return the tube of paste to its stand and slowly and gently connect the brush to your mouth in general and teeth in particular. Now the real brushing starts and what a beautifully satisfying experience it is! As you brush your teeth the first thing that hits you is the sweet aroma of the paste. I always give my nose a treat by choosing a paste with good aroma and while brushing continues I dwell on the scent and it is always relaxing to be slipped off one’s feet into the world of sweet memories accompanying the aroma, at least for a minute. I also choose a paste which tastes well as taste buds in the tongue deserve their dues for having given a good account of themselves during the day. As I live in a warm climate, I always make it a point to stand or sit beneath a fan while brushing so that the greater part of my body doesn’t feel let down as I enjoy this sweetest of all experiences. As the cool breeze play with my hair and caress my face and massage my whole body all my senses tingle with pleasure. My eyes prefer to remain shut at this time to help take in all these sensations without any distractions. Now as you brush in circular, horizontal, perpendicular and every kind of strokes and motions your teeth get the feeling that they are loved and pampered. Be one with their joy because they can feel joy only through you. If you are not there, absent to their subtle needs, how can they feel pampered. So be present there where your brush goes. Now feel the rising lather inside your mouth and how they press against the flesh of your inner cheeks. Listen to the sound of bristles brushing against your teeth and the bones supporting them. Once in a while gently brush over your tongue, gums and palate and feel the sensation of it. Your tongue loves cleaning too, let it be pampered for a while. At the end of brushing, clean it with a tongue-cleaner and be also present there. Your presence is needed all the time during brushing, so be there to say “present sir” always, never failing.

Now let me tell you some whys and wherefores of it. Though we live in the body, most of the time we don’t feel it. Mind and body live as if they are independent of each other. In this state of mind it gets disconnected from the wisdom of the self normally felt through the body. The self is highly intuitive and is the storehouse of all wisdom. Mind is mostly repetitive memory and wishful egoistic thoughts. It has a propensity to wander everywhere. It is never there where it should be, in the body. It is never present in the here and now. In this unregenerate, fallen state it is a danger to itself and the body. But it is the only instrument of the self along with the body to get things done. How to yoke this wandering mind to the body so that the self can accomplish whatever it wishes to accomplish? One of the ways is to watch the breathing. Thoughts are controlled as breathing becomes conscious, regular or rhythmic. Another way is to feel the sensations in your body. Sensations are reflections of thoughts in the body. Watching and feeling sensations in the body is a way of mooring mind to the present, the here and now. It is also a way of entering into the timeless through the here and now. In short, brushing your teeth mindfully and consciously can keep your mind anchored to the here and now and thus can free you from the torture of a wandering mind. Mind alone can create a whole world of problems for you. An agitated mind only creates fears and miseries. Buddha said, ” All happiness follows a man like night follows day whose mind is at rest.” A mind at rest is also called a virtuous mind or pure mind. Some also call it as no mind. In this state only, creative ideas come as flashes of intuitions. All great scientists, artists, poets and saints do their best work under the spell of this creative, non-repetitive and intuitive state of mind or no mind. Brushing your teeth mindfully is a way of connecting to that state. In fact, any work done meditatively, mindfully can be your point of entry into here and now and through that into eternity or timelessness. Now is not a part of time, it is timelessness felt in the body.

Now let me come back to our story of brushing teeth. You have cleaned your teeth, gum and tongue. Now rinse your mouth as well as your brush and tongue- cleaner. Just because you are nearing the finishing line of your job should not make you complacent or let your guards down. Do not hurry. Unconsciousness and mindlessness can seep into you finding chinks in your armor. Hold your fort. Be present where you are. Pay attention to the sound of running water from your tap. Don’t be heedless of the touch of water on your hand, face and inside of the mouth. While rinsing your mouth, remember that nothing works like the old fashioned gurgling. Take mouthfuls of water and watch yourself in the mirror and start gurgling loudly as if your life depends on gurgling. Don’t be shy. Make all sorts of faces at the mirror while you are furiously gurgling. I would advise you not to just gurgle, be the gurgling itself. If at that moment anybody happens to see you he may think that you have gone mad. But never mind him or her. At least that much price you should be ready to pay for your being connected to this fountain of delight that is brushing of your teeth.

Now having yourself satisfied that no traces of food particles can be found lodged between your teeth, you put back your instruments safely in their stand and hold a clean cloth to dry your face. Dry your face slowly and deliberately. Don’t forget to register the scent of the clean cloth and the feeling of it rubbing your face. Now you can rest in peace for having done a beautiful job beautifully accomplished. Just a few parting words remained. The whole operation should be finished within ten minutes and the actual or core brushing of teeth part should not exceed five minutes. Your teeth lose enamel if brushed harder or for longer time. But within that time there should not be any hurry. Always use a soft brush. Brush gently too. In this age of hurry and rushedness the art of brushing teeth has largely been given a go by. It has been thrown into the way side. All brush teeth as if it is a necessary evil or a job best done inattentively or as if something more important, more solid can be thought of during that seemingly wasted time. But I say “father, forgive them for they know not what they are doing.” They call it a quickie, a task best done as quickly as possible and forgotten as quickly. But I can say, I am ready to sacrifice any number of quickies for a regular, mindful, unhurried and intimate job well done and remembered for a long time that is till the next time. Yes, when you have really grown fond of the art, even the next time will seem a long time ahead.

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    •  

      Steven Steensels 

      The timelessness felt in the body, oh yes ! I fully join you with the happy treat self is giving to its body, for it takes a whole universe to have this body live my life. If the world is to be inhabited at all, here at last is a fit inhabi…See More
      August 13 at 7:25pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Tom Clausen My feelings for toothbrushing have been wonderfully advanced, Paresh, and as much as I have usually enjoyed, even if too quickly, this art form, my approach will certainly be savored now days with your wonderful account in mind and heart. 🙂 thank you! 

      August 13 at 7:36pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Ishvari Lockhart 

      Paresh…amazing because the same thing happened to me when reading it. Once a friend was using various techniques to reveal some of Gurjieff’s teachings and he used cleaning teeth as an example…how we are not present in the moment and hy…See More
      August 13 at 7:49pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Kaila Kukla this is great and of couse can be applied to any of our chores mindfully performed..thx 

      August 13 at 9:05pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Grace Mendoza 

      Hi Paresh!
      Thanks once again for sharing your love with me. I found your story interesting and it reminded me of what I here all around me …… it is about living the moment, no matter what you do! So I see you enjoying the moment as you…See More
      August 13 at 9:06pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Julia Day Present Innocence 😉 ♥ 

      August 13 at 9:33pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Pudugram Vaidyanathan Hi Paresh, I can see that I was wrong about the brushing stuffl.. Must use a different example next time. Everyday I am learning something new in this life. thanks. 

      August 13 at 9:34pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Bob Grumbine Interesting example and may be the reason why the homosexually regimented criminal thugs in the dentifraud “profession” in the Loonie Tied Studs are so adamant about smashing teeth out of human faces, utterly destroying dentition, so as to prevent humans from properly chewing or enjoying food and to permanently prevent consumption of anything of any chewing requiring substance by the victims of their criminal attacks under “color of license”. 

      August 13 at 10:09pm · Like
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      Adriana Hill Paresh, loved the light hearted nature of this! I laughed upon reading it, and am still smiling thinking of it… 

      August 14 at 1:27am · Unlike ·  5 people
    •  

      Tim Hartman 

      I feel like Adriana, especially with the facial expression line…I appreciate your humor Paresh. 🙂 You talked about the “mind at rest” and enjoying the moment so as not to ruin the very beauty and purity of things by rushing their happen…See More
      August 14 at 6:11am · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Grace Ana Kenealy 

      ‎((Paresh)) I hurriedly rushed around the grocery store today to pick up several necessities, but savored the aisle which housed a diverse family of toothbrushes and pastes. Ended up choosing a NEW delicious peppermint flavored Burt’s Bees…See More
      August 14 at 6:26am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Carolyn Wind lol….thank you, my friend…for this beautiful description of being in the Moment~~ 

      August 14 at 8:24am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Orly Zirinsky thank you-sharing! 

      August 14 at 5:38pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Linda Darling Langlois 

      This was such a joy to read. Thank you for including me, Paresh. And, yes, it can be enjoyed with everything. 

      I was just thinking this morning how easy it is for me to take a joyful experience like this and, if not vigilant, turn it into a j…See More

      August 14 at 10:02pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Gina Lake Wonderful, wonderful story about being in the moment and how even such a small act can be pleasurable and divine! Thank you! Much love… 

      August 15 at 12:40am · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Russie Wight-Waltman Paresh~~I love this because it resonates as I brush my teeth willingly and mindfully after every meal…and floss! When I do go to dentist they are always surprised to see I have almost no plaque so there are real benefits to this pleasurable teeth brushing : ) I have an electric tooth brush, btw. 

      August 15 at 4:18am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Robin Zak thank you Paresh, i enjoyed reading every word…every act done in mindfulness is worship, whether brushing our teeth, or scrubbing the pots… it is a blessing to be reminded of each action, and i am grateful ♥ 

      August 16 at 10:13am · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Linda Darling Langlois When I brushed my teeth last night, I thought back to this essay and said to myself, “You will never brush your teeth in the same way again.” 🙂 

      August 16 at 10:15am · Unlike ·  2 people
  •  

One day as I was coming down the road on my way home, after my classes in the college were over, I heard loud wailing of a woman. Usually no adults in this part of the world wailed so loudly. If someone had to wail she normally stifled or at least muffled her sound of crying fearing what people were to comment or think of her. But that day was not a usual day for that woman. She had no such considerations or restraints in her. It was a loud heart wrenching cry. I stopped in my track to investigate the reasons of such commotions and crying. So I left my path and proceeded in the direction from which the sound was coming.

The house from which the sound came was nearby. As I neared the house I saw her. She was sitting on the floor of the house which was completely open on one side, having no doors. She sat there, her back to the path. As I peered over her into the house, following the direction of her look, I saw a boy of 12 or 14 lying on the floor on his back, his eyes closed as if in deep sleep, his face calm and serene but no breathing could be discerned from his unmoving belly and chest. Some incense were burning over his head and a few flowers were strewn on and around him. Some women and children were sitting there surrounding him. Obviously the woman who was crying loudly was his mother. I wanted to see her face and take in myriad details of that situation. So even though there were no males present inside the house, I went past her into the house and sat on the floor beside the boy, facing both him and his mother.

What I gathered from the woman’s wailing and children sitting there was that the boy and his father were trying to bring down a very thick mud wall, only a few feet away from the place we sat, which became redundant due to remodeling of the house. As the father on one side and the son on the other side were pulling and pushing the wall with the help of crowbars, the wall came crashing down on the son. The wall proved too heavy for the shocked parents to move aside and before help could reach, the boy was dead before the unbelieving eyes of the dazed parents.

Like all accidents this one too had happened in the twinkling of an eye. To the parents’ incredulous eyes the accident had happened as if in a dream, as if they were in a bad nightmare which was in no mood of coming to an end. In her helplessness, as women do everywhere, she wailed loudly to feel her loss in her heart and soul, to make others understand the enormity of her loss, to show others her despair, her wronged sense of justice at the cruel hand of fate and of course how loving, caring and good her son had been. She was a Bengali refugee from East Pakistan, now Bangladesh, rehabilitated in a refugee colony in Orissa, in the eastern coastal state of India, near my village. So while she wept she simultaneously narrated her grief, her life situation in Bengali. Even now, after so many years of the incident, I am haunted by her words “manush ki kare?” “What can man do (against the onslaught of the fate)?”

To such a heart wrenching situation I was ushered in by the fate for reasons too deep for me to find or fathom. I saw it all, I felt it deeply. Especially I cannot forget till my last how the woman for some seconds abruptly stopped crying as she saw me, a stranger but educated from the appearance, stopping by her son. For a moment she must have thought that I could bring her son back to life by some miracle of faith or science. Our eyes met for a moment during that silence and very quickly she must have read my helplessness from my eyes. So she resumed her wailing soon after. But to me those silent moments of her expectations were so real, dense and palpable that as if time had frozen for me, as if those terrible, silent moments extended into eternity. I was equally helpless and undone in my sorrow at her loss. I was unable to console her; I just simply didn’t know the words. I stood up from the floor and mustered enough courage to go to the woman and said very gently, ” Mother, please don’t cry anymore. The one who was crushed under the wall was not your son only; he was God Himself in the form of your son. Can He ever die?” As I said that I was overwhelmed with emotions of such intensity that I wept uncontrollably and left the place in a hurry.

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    •  

      Rebecca Artful Heartful Thank you for this deep and sacred sharing of this story Paresh. Weeping with you. 

      August 13 at 5:38pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Nana Trianasari Oh,,, Thank you Pareshji for sharing your story. People said that God plays hide & seek.. One day He comes as a friend, family…or anyone we know or we love…and another day He in the form of our beloved ones disappears forever for whatever reason… But the love is stilll there..that we may find Him in others…another friend, a new member of family… Even in death love lives on.. Doesnt He want us to realise that He is in everyone and thus we should love everyone..? 

      August 13 at 7:10pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Steven Steensels Dear Paresh. I thouroughly appreciate your letters. When expressing our ideas through sentences, the clarity of the former depend on the precision we give to the latter. And that’s precisely what you are doing 🙂 

      August 13 at 7:31pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Carmen Pentek Oh, beautiful, Paresh. When I lost my daughter today in the mall I thought I might never find her again. I was just hoping that she did not run outside to the street… Also here I was distracted for few seconds only… 

      August 13 at 10:51pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Amal Gupta Yes, life is like that…. very touching…. I am speechless 

      August 14 at 12:04am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Irene Bradle Thank you for sharing this heartfelt story. I consider you to be not only my friend, but also my teacher. Blessings to you, always. 

      August 14 at 1:12am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Adriana Hill this is a story about how we grieve our deepest griefs, and you have just offered another powerful perspective of the cycle of our “visits” to this planet which we call mortal life..if strangers can evoke this recognition in you Paresh, you are a very powerful teacher! 

      August 14 at 1:14am · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Denise Burley 

      Beautiful…All lessons are sent to us, and in this your lesson was felt within your open-heart…You see love does that… It opens the door and extends, it heals, if only for a tender moment. it offers an ear, a tender smile, an honouring…See More
      August 14 at 1:30am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Unity Walker Wonderful story–God can never die! Thank you, Brother Maharaj ji. 

      August 14 at 1:46am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Ishvari Lockhart ♥ 

      August 14 at 2:54am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Diederik Wolsak a moment of grace, thank you 

      August 14 at 3:12am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Tim Hartman Only a person truly tuned into their own unity could feel something this strongly and recognize it for what it was…as you did Paresh. I have seen people unable to acknowledge their own grief or that of another as they aren’t in touch with themselves. That grief gets suppressed, and often becomes anger which is at the base of depression. Feeling is an expression of unity. Thank you for constantly stimulating and challenging me with your words. 

      August 14 at 6:21am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Shira Lee ‎~ Beautiful…..thank you! ~ 

      August 14 at 7:33am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Grace Ana Kenealy Deeply, deeply touched. Thank you…namaskar ♥ 

      August 14 at 7:56am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Julia Day 

      Such perfect Wisdom came through you Brother, a healing in profound tenderness for all of us who dream of death… Thank you in Oneness ♥ 

      from Autobiography of a Yogi: ““Now a certain man was sick, named Lazarus. . . . When Jesus heard that…See More

      August 14 at 9:22am · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Joy Anna Oh Paresh this is an incredibly painful beautiful experience and brings gratitude tears to my eyes… thank you dear One heart for sharing this
      ((((((( ♥ ))))))) 

      August 14 at 9:37am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Evelyn Aung-Thwin Thank you Julia, for taking the time to copy the text of Sri Yukteswar’s experience. So beautiful. Jesus said in the Bible that we would heal others, even better than he had. Few believe it. Healing comes in many forms. Paresh, your walking in and sharing the agony of this mother’s experience was healing also. 

      August 14 at 10:22am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      X Lyn Johnson Thank you brother for reminding me of my own divinity. Thou art God. 

      August 14 at 11:26am · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Sudhir Jain very very touching story Paresh and yes here starts the query first Why Me? and what was my fault? and comes a deep longing for meaning and logic, but can we find one ? 

      August 14 at 1:59pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Eva Koval dear Paresh, so beautifully expressed….god being crushed by the wall, god crying out in sorrow for losing its form in the name of the son…love it ♥ 

      August 14 at 4:35pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Irene Rhodes Your writing is gentle, charming and beautiful. :0) 

      August 14 at 6:12pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      VictoriaRose Denham ‎((((((( ☼ )))))))) 

      August 15 at 12:36am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Lori Schwegel You are the most eloquent and perceptive friend I have known in a long time.. We can all walk away from this story changed! 

      August 15 at 4:09am · Unlike ·  1 person
  •  

Sachi’s sunny smile was a thing to be enjoyed. His dark and freckled face with gaping teeth became alive when he flashed his radiant smile. He was a peon in our office. Very often, when he was free, he used to come to me. I always offered a seat to him and exchanged pleasantries with him. We talked about our families, office gossips, news and events of the day and everything that was of mutual interest to us. He was an extremely inquisitive man, though he read very little in schools and had even less to show by way of his educational qualifications. I always gave him my undivided attention when he inquired of me about anything. Such was his curiosity that his face became alive with a question as if something got inflamed inside him. I enjoyed his company and never considered his frequent comings as interruptions to my work which I completed anyway by staying a few minutes more in office after the usual office hour.

I didn’t know, at that time, why he was such extremely curious about me. I had never seen him talk with anybody else at such length as he talked with me. He was especially interested in my conjugal life. By looking at his face, I could correctly predict that his next question would be about my marital life. He was mostly curious about my absentee wife. At that time she was living almost for a year with her parents’ as, according to a custom prevailing then, a newly married woman on conceiving was brought back to her parents’ where she stayed till she gave birth to her child and was only reunited with her husband on completion of the third month of the child. Of course, this was prevalent among those who could afford, those parents who couldn’t were excused. Sachi was greatly curious about this custom which was not in vogue in his native place. India is a very vast country with vast population. Customs and beliefs changed almost every mile or so. But Sachi’s primary interest, curiously for me, remained constant, it was my conjugal life. When we talked, somehow or other, he would veer the conversation round to this pet subject from which his interest never flagged.

One day he asked, ” Sir, may I ask you one thing?” This was how he always prefaced those questions concerning my private life, but he never waited long for my consent as he knew that nothing of my life was off limit for him. So he continued, ” What do you do when you are on your own, during the long time, after the office hour is over?”

I replied that usually I read books, all sorts of books; there is a world of books to be read and that I wanted to read a lot many of them. Besides, I cooked for myself and did the shoppings for vegetables, fruits and other things that I needed for myself.

He said, “I understand now how you spend your time. You are learned. That’s why I come to you for knowing things that I don’t understand. You know, I can’t read more than the daily newspapers in my own language. I can’t read English books or papers. You are knowledgeable. But aren’t you bothered by any other kind of thoughts ?”

I said, “What do you mean?”

He replied, “I mean the thoughts about your wife who remains mostly absent. Don’t you miss her?”

I said, “yes, I miss her a lot, I wish her back soon after her delivery or as soon after that. I write letters to her to cheer her up and she also writes letters to me instructing me not to forget her and that always makes me smile because she is always in my mind. We were together only for three months and that passed like a week before this drama took place and she was taken away to her parents’. I wished the conception didn’t take place so soon. But we are to be blamed, we didn’t take any precautions..”

Sachi interrupted, ” I was not meaning that, sir, I meant something else.”

“What did you mean?’ I asked.

“I mean, doesn’t her being at some other place than where you are, ever bother you?” Sachi asked.

I replied, “Sachi, I know she is happy and safe at her parents’. Theirs’ is a large family consisting of seven brothers and five sisters. She is youngest of them all except one. All of them are married and they all have their own children. Her parents are alive. All love her. She dotes on her nephews and nieces. There is nothing to be bothered or worried about her…”

Sachi again interrupted, ” I didn’t mean that either, sir, I meant something else.”

This time I was a bit irritated. I asked impatiently, ” What else, Sachi, do you want to know?”

“Sir, what I mean is don’t you feel insecure at her prolonged absence?” Sachi asked.

Surprised at his question, I asked, ” Insecure? Why? What for?”

He replied,” Sir, please excuse me for asking this, but don’t you feel she might do some hanky panky behind your back? Or somebody, some past lover might try to tempt and seduce her in your absence? I can’t remain in peace while my wife is away from me. I can’t remain serene and calm, as I always find you, when my wife is not before my eyes.” Sachi said this vehemently which was unusual for him.

” Sachi, this thought had really never crossed my mind. But why do you think so? Do you feel insecure yourself? Why this doubt and why raising this monster of an imagined lover? Why can’t you live without your wife for some time? If necessary, why can’t you live without her even for some months? Ours’ is just a temporary arrangement. She is at her parents’ for a good cause, at least all her own people think so. Why should I doubt her? Tell me, Sachi, why?” I demanded of him insistently.

He was all hemming and hawing at first. He was most hesitant to speak anything. But I was unrelenting till I got a proper answer. He had to yield. What came out was the sad story of his life or more accurately his life situation. He narrated his story in this way:

“On my parents’ demise, to look after my ancestral house and property, I left my wife and two kids at my village and I remained in my Govt. quarters. I used to visit them every weekend and bring them provisions and things they needed. Only a younger brother who was 20 and didn’t yet marry stayed with us. Everything went well for some time. Then on one of my subsequent visits I noticed changes in the behavior of my wife and the younger brother. Something in their activities and movements made me suspicious of their conduct. I felt extremely uncomfortable. When I questioned my wife, in private, she flatly denied and accused me of having a nasty and suspicious mind. But I was not convinced. I came away and thought about a plan. One day in the midst of a week, I set out for my village unannounced. I waited outside the village till midnight when I surprised both of them and caught them red handed. I scolded them, threatened them with dire consequences but ultimately brought her and the kids with me to the Govt quarters here. Now I cannot live with her nor can live without her. The memories of the past always torment me to no end. I am in untold misery now. Since then my suspicion of her behavior is such that I cannot leave her for a moment. While I come to office I leave her with utmost reluctance always imagining of the worst. Even while I am talking to you now, I fear she is doing some hanky panky, some mischief with somebody. It is a terrible time of my life. I find no peace. How do you manage to remain so calm and serene while your wife is away from you for well over a year? Sir, please tell me, how do you manage? What is the secret? I have always wanted to know this from you but somehow avoided to confess till now. How can I too get peace?”

I took a deep breath in, felt the aliveness of my being, the inner presence, prayed a very short prayer silently for Sachi and braced myself for a reply that would cover all his questions and even some more he has not asked but might ask. I said, “Sachi, tell me, did you ever love your wife? Don’t tell me you both behaved this way from the very beginning.”

Sachi protested, saying, ” No sir, we were not so earlier. We loved each other very dearly. The days and nights we spent together just after our marriage, were the happiest of my life. They were as blissful as human happiness can ever be. At least I have not known greater joys than that. It is only my villainous brother who ruined our relationship and joy.”

I said, “Sachi, if you could just focus on those days you spent blissfully together, you loving her and she loving you, how would that feel? Just focus on those moments of togetherness when you both felt so happy to be alive and so privileged to love someone and to be loved in return and the sense of wonder that life could be so beautiful when you are in love. Does it feel good ? Does it make you feel fresh and unburdened ? If yes, stay in that feeling for a couple of minutes, take a deep breath in and let go of your cares and anxieties.”

After a small pause I asked, ” How do you feel now, Sachi?”

“I am feeling a little calmer and quieter than before.” He replied.

“That is the trick, the secret you wanted to know. What you focus on grows. If I focus on love and peace, then love and peace grow in me. In that state of love and peace within, it is easy to trust and love others outside. The world just reflects what is within you. If your mind is full of fear, hatred or guilt it even brings out situations that mirror or confirm them. Your worst fears come true, your doubts and suspicions engendered by your fear get confirmed. What you search for you find. It is all mind’s play. It is your choice whether you feed your base emotions like fear, guilt and hatred or you feed your higher emotions like love, kindness and compassion. I strongly advise you to choose love and kindness and abstain altogether from being suspicious of your wife’s fidelity and loyalty. An insecure man almost always finds confirmations of his wife’s infidelity because he searches for confirmation outside what is already within him; his emotions of fear, guilt and hatred. Mind has a self fulfilling propensity, it sees what it wishes to see not what is there to be seen. Insecure man and unfaithful wife, they almost go together. They make a syndrome, it can be called as the Insecure Man and Unfaithful Wife Syndrone, in short, IMUWS. It is like many other syndromes, one for example is IBS or Irritable Bowel Syndrome. An insecure man almost always brings about an attack of unfaithfulness on the wife. Even in such cases where this unfaithfulness is imaginary, the effect on the husband is equally real. It makes no difference, the man suffers in either case from a serious bout of IMUWS. That is what you are suffering from and that explains your unusual and obsessive interest in my conjugal life. There is also another syndrome that can be called as Insecure Woman and Unfaithful Husband Syndrome or, in short, IWUHS. Modus Operandi is the same. But as it is not relevant to your case, we can discuss it some other day.”

“But you can be healed from this debilitating disease, caused from feeding the base emotions, by refocusing on love. Love your wife as you love yourself. Love her without bringing in the murky past, without judgment and comparison, without putting any conditions on her, so unreservedly and totally that nothing else can come between you two. You will both be healed in the fire of love. Love also can forgive twenty mistakes, so forgive her and seek forgiveness from her. Forgiveness is a great healer. You can even forgive your younger brother. Just imagine that he and your wife enacted this drama, devised the situations to show you your hidden fears, insecurities and obsessions so that you will be healed and freed of them forever. They are, in fact, your teachers out to teach you the most valuable lesson of your life. Almost all of our important lessons of life we learn through sufferings. The things that I am telling you now have also been learned through my share of sufferings.”

“Lastly, surrender your fears, insecurities, worries and all to God by opening your heart to Him. It is said that He hears but to those who tell Him. He will make you secure and strong after taking away all your burden. A secure man is not he who is physically strong or very rich or who holds high office and power but he who is surrendered and lives for others, loves and serves others. He sees himself in others.”

“So this problem of unfaithfulness, though apparently physical, is actually a spiritual crisis in the heart of man. It can only be solved by attending to the spiritual component fully and finally. People like Ramakrishna Paramahansa will never have this problem. I do not have the data but I am sure you are not alone to suffer from this. My surmise is this that there are a lot many others too. This is more widely spread than people are ready to acknowledge. But there is nothing to be afraid of on that count. You are to heal only yourself and the world will be changed for you.”

Sachi was patiently listening to me so far and at this point he chose to ask his last question, ” Sir, can’t your wife deceive you just because you love and trust her? Can’t she be unfaithful to you?”

I replied, ” Yes, Sachi, she can but I wouldn’t know. I respect her fully as an individual. I don’t invade her private inner space where she is supreme to decide what is right and wrong for her. If someone fascinates her so much that he becomes irresistible for her not to fall in love with, then to hell with the social mores and sanctions, I will respect her decisions. I may even want to be friendly with the guy. I won’t, in that case, consider her as being unfaithful to me; I would rather think that she is being faithful to herself,faithful to the desire of her heart to experience a man whose vibrations matched her’s. I won’t consider them doing some mischief behind my back for that would mean I am taking things too personally whereas I am in no way concerned. It is a thing between two consenting adults who ought to know good and bad for themselves. Her loving someone else doesn’t cast aspersions on me, doesn’t compare me unfavorably, doesn’t prove her intent to malign or wrong me unless I take things too personally.The truth is, in their love or even lovemaking, I am nowhere in the picture unless I bring myself forcibly into their midst and spoil their happiness and my peace. So I practice throughout the day a meditation I have given myself, that is, not to take things too personally. Actually there is very little personal in the way the world runs.Things have a way of working out impersonally. I am just a tiny spark in the vast sky that is existence. People here are not my enemies out to wreck or break me, not even my wife’s lover, if there is one. Everyone you meet is engaged in fighting his or her own battle,finding his or her own joy and fulfillment. No one is concerned with me unless I take things personally and in that case the whole world would seem to be enemies turned against me. Actually, there are no enemies only seeming ones. So I can love a unfaithful wife too because underneath these apparent labels such as unfaithful, unchaste or adulterous etc. shines her pristine and sacred self which is untouched by any such superficial labels and judgments. She cannot be unfaithful or faithful to me, she can only be faithful or unfaithful to her sacred self. A truly loving and secure man never knows this problem of infidelity. So I would advise people who are tortured like you, Sachi, to deeply love their wives and be freed forever from the monster of jealousy and infidelity. I focus on love only as that is what I am and her too. I don’t focus on the fear of losing her, nor any guilt over any real or imaginary negligence of her nor do I seek proof or confirmation of her infidelity. People and things which have no use for you leave you on their own and whatever is yours and relevant for your growth either stays with you or comes to you miraculously from nowhere. The right people stay with you and the wrong ones leave. Nothing is to be afraid of. Everything happens beautifully, inexorably and impersonally. You are just to accept it all or let go all. I have a habit of imagining Reality as a, say, 500000 horse power train which is coming down at full throttle. Would you put your small wagon of I, me and mine in its track or would you just stand aside? This standing aside is taking things impersonally and seeing things as they are. Great love is required to see things impersonally, without attachment. So I focus on love and trust which are more aligned to the truth of my being than fear or suspicion. Love is a higher power and higher frequency emotion, it dispels fears and suspicions. Love is its own reward too. You love and feel at home everywhere, with every body and everything. I am convinced that we are all One in various manifestations. We differ only in names and forms but actually are One in essence.”

Office hour was long since past. All the lights except the light burning over our head had been switched off. We both rose to depart for home. On a sudden impulse I hugged him closely and felt his warm heart beating against mine. A thought came over and made me happy,’ Be thy brother’s keeper’.

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    •  

      Alan Jacobs Finely written short story with a moral purpose. thank you 

      August 3 at 1:19pm · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Pudugram Vaidyanathan Nice story and good advice. Yes, most men are insecure when it comes to their wives. I suppose wives too must be worried about their husbands going astray. Perhaps it is this fear, this insecurity that makes both possessive of each other. We must consciously try and get over such insecurities. Thanks for a good write up and tagging me. 

      August 3 at 1:19pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Nana Trianasari Thank you for sharing the story & the lesson… Namaste.. 

      August 3 at 3:08pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Santosh Kunte When one buys the story, pain is inevitable. Man must see the false paradigm of heavily relying on object consciousness alone for the happiness. We have soaked too much of a culture which only ends up dividing us in the polarity of pain & pleasure. When we take refuge in stories, they have full power over us. Get loose and sing the eternal song. Man must rise above the polarity to retain the sovereignty. 

      August 3 at 3:20pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Carmen Pentek Nice story, Paresh. Jealosy has so many roots and so does infedelity. But in any case it is good to focus on love, our own love deep inside. The right person will stay with us, the wrong person will leave us. Nothing needs to be feared. Lets just stay open minded and loving. OM 

      August 3 at 3:28pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Susan Armaiti Zinowsky What a wonderful story.. touching, full of love and wisdom ! Thank you for sharing this dear Paresh! 

      August 3 at 4:07pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Sudhir Jain very well written kudos paresh. 

      August 3 at 4:34pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Steven Steensels What love is the one that makes people suffer so much ?
      Thank you, dear friend, for sharing your stories with me. Count me as a fan 🙂 

      August 3 at 5:21pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Becky Bonam Thank you so much for the tag Paresh, I love short story’s I have to run off to work, but I will look forward to reading this all day! Thank you ♥
      Will check back later with my post read ♥ Im sure! ♥♥! 

      August 3 at 5:41pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Vasudev Pandit aha! it touches my heart. i know insecurity. i am suffering from IBS since my childhood. 

      August 3 at 6:00pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Soniya Aurora thnxx for tag pareshji . a thoughtful article about the indian man or woman psyche -the common indian person or maybe it applies to people all over the world- insecurity about your partner happens due to lack of communication . when a relationship is nurtured with mutual acceptance ,trust, respect , unconditional love n caring for each other then there is no question of any insecurites !! 

      August 3 at 7:50pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Picky Curmudgeon Thank you for writing this Paresh. I am an unjustifiably jealous man. It is something I struggle with. I have lost valued friendships because of it. Your story has helped me see myself more clearly and has helped me. 

      August 3 at 8:00pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Adriana Hill 

      Paresh,
      Another special installation from a very special author. Left me with several morsels that I’d love to quote you from. Thank you for sharing your heart with us. What you describe I call Fierce Love. A love that can overpower all im…See More
      August 3 at 8:07pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Carmen Vera 

      You know, Paresh, honestly, love is simply boundless. It cannot be caged or tied to only one person.
      I have fallen in love after meeting my husband and it did not diminuish my love to him at all. I did not get physical with other men, but I …See More
      August 3 at 9:05pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Julia Day 

      The world is not coming at us, but from us. Choosing Love in all situations, even when there is infidelity or betrayal, heals my mind and the mind of the seeming other. We are One Mind in Spirit. This is how karma is dissolved, through h…See More
      August 3 at 9:26pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Suresh C Sharma ‎”..Just imagine that he and your wife enacted this drama, devised the situations to show you your hidden fears, insecurities and obsessions so that you will be healed and freed of them forever..” very nice. 

      August 3 at 10:00pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Picky Curmudgeon 

      I am amazed at the resistance I experience within myself to accept the lesson that you make so obvious. That part deep inside of me that screams in rage, “NO! I WANT THINGS TO BE OTHER THAN THEY ARE! I AM A VICTIM! I AM!”, and insists on cl…See More
      August 3 at 10:17pm · Unlike ·  3 people
    •  

      Irene Bradle Your wisdom and insight never fails to fill me with wonder. Thank you for sharing. Namaste, my dear friend. 

      August 3 at 10:27pm · Unlike ·  4 people
    •  

      Miriam Strauss A family is a place where minds come in contact with one another. If these minds love one another, the home will be as beautiful as a flower garden. But if these minds get out of harmony with one another it is like a storm that plays havoc with the garden. 

      August 3 at 11:15pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Deborah Judith 

      This is a great joy to read and completely validates my own experience with loss. It may be tempting to hold onto lower feelings but they block one from direct experience of the Divine and one’s own soul bliss. The more one practices love &…See More
      August 4 at 12:48am · Unlike ·  5 people
    •  

      Elizabeth Patrick I agree that positive thoughts draw positive energy to us, and what we see in an experience reveals our character. 

      August 4 at 8:16am via Facebook Mobile · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Tim Hartman 

      ‎”Almost all of our important lessons of life we learn through sufferings. The things that I am telling you now have also been learned through my share of sufferings.” 

      Paresh, that sentence jumped off the page at me. I can now say that it’s…See More

      August 4 at 4:18pm · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Picky Curmudgeon Well said Tim. 

      August 4 at 4:33pm · Like
    •  

      Tim Hartman Thank you Picky. 

      August 4 at 9:17pm · Like ·  1 person
    •  

      Irene Harvey you give excellent advice, paresh. love is not one human being possessing another. that is ugly.
      since you focus on the love you give, the rest takes care of itself. 

      August 7 at 5:03am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Nana Trianasari Dear Pareshji, thank you so much………….. 

      August 7 at 4:58pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Greeshma Myneni Dear Paresh Ji, was this your personal experience? Either way it was very well narrated with a moral at the end.. Thanks ! 

      August 8 at 8:16am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Jacqueline Green What good advice! Thank you Paresh. 

      August 8 at 9:08am · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

      Bob Grumbine 

      I gather, Paresh, that you have no such thing in your country as the divorce racketeering industry, discussed in detail at http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=5132407247 which encourages not mere “unfaithfulness” against monogamists but c…See More
      August 8 at 11:05am · Like
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      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj 

      Greeshma,the plot of the story,the basic skeleton including some dialogues,is based on real life experience of Sachi, a very dear,charming friend who is no more in this world.I did not have the heart to change anything in the story,includ…See More
      August 8 at 5:14pm · Like ·  2 people
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      Adriana Hill You must never cease writing. 

      August 8 at 8:20pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj Yes,Adriana,I may never cease writing if such a platform like this continues to be available to me and friends like you and others are there to read them. 

      August 8 at 8:35pm · Like ·  3 people
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      Greeshma Myneni That’s so wonderful ! 

      August 8 at 8:53pm · Like ·  1 person
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      Richard Kogerup Pareshji , I am so honored to be you Brother ! This piece and your mind are pure , your warm heart and wisdom are SACRED ! I thank God for this Blessing and ask him to continue to Bless you with your healing abilities ! so be it , Ricky 

      August 8 at 9:45pm · Like
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      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj 

      Thank you Ricky for liking the story.But I don’t deserve your effusive and generous praise,especially,regarding my “healing abilities”.I have no illusions about that.In spite of all my advices,I couldn’t revive the earlier cheerfulness,the…See More
      August 8 at 10:36pm · Like ·  2 people
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      Richard Kogerup Pareshji thank you for this update and your friendship , Have a awesome day and please continue to write ! No thank you required ! Ricky 

      August 8 at 11:00pm · Like
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      Bob Grumbine 

      Thanks Paresh for clarifying some of “the rest of the story” about Sachi. With your orientation towards presenting things in a positive light, I’m not sure you’d even be able to *see* the rest of the poisoning and brutality which Sachi’s “…See More
      August 8 at 11:12pm · Like
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      Denise Burley How beautiful Paresh!! You see with beauty, with an open-heart. As in ACIM: “The world you see and witness to is an outside picture of an inward condition.” 

      August 8 at 11:43pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj Thank you Denise for seeing so clearly into the heart of the story.With your wonderful quotation you exactly laid out the theme which I tried to illustrate in so many words in my story. 

      August 8 at 11:51pm · Like
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      ShreeDhar Shree 

      ‎^_^
      Incredible OBSERVATION :
      “Reality as a, say, 500000 horse power train which is coming down at full throttle,would you put your small wagon of I,me and mine in its track or would you just stand aside?This standing aside is taking things i…See More
      August 9 at 12:32am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Susan Welsh It took me a while to comment on this cause it struck close to home. The only thing was, the tables were turned. I know the next time I am feeling that I am unappreciated, I will look within self for the answers. Thank you Paresh for your gift f spinning words into gold!!! 

      August 12 at 9:09am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Babina Shrestha Thank you Paresh ji! ♥ 

      August 13 at 8:39pm · Like
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      Neelam Sethi Thank u Pareshji, for enlightening us with this beautiful story and U have this fantastic art of imparting deep HEART-RENDING TRUTHS WITH UTMOST SIMPLICITY AND CASUALNESS!!THANX ONCE AGAIN! 

      August 20 at 6:41pm · Unlike ·  1 person
    •  

I met Bhagwan  in a most unexpected place in the most unusual way imaginable. I met him after fifteen long years and by that time a thick dust of oblivion had already settled over my memory of him. When I met him he was the last person I was searching for. Actually, why would I search for a man in a  sprawling Government  hospital  who was neither my family nor a friend nor even  a near or distant relative? Actually I was there to see a relative who was ailing. But when I reached there on getting the news of the sickness of the relative I found him already discharged and gone. I met Bhagwan  when I was  about to leave the hospital. I could easily have not noticed him as he was lying on his bed indistinguishable from  scores of other patients lying on their indistinguishable beds. But sometimes miracles do happen, someone or something quite ordinary too catches your attention  and then you wonder  for a while if you are living in a small world. When I saw him my mind suddenly got unclutched from the tension of searching  from ward to ward and from bed to bed  after a  sick relative a little while earlier and finally being told of his departure. It now got latched on to Bhagwan’s reclining body on a hospital bed. I went nearer and  found  an elderly woman  with him sitting on  a corner of the bed. He was  asleep. So  in order not to disturb him in his sleep I waited at a little distance till he was awoke.

I watched him mindfully from that distance. He looked old  and tired and most of his hairs had turned white though he couldn’t have been more than  forty or forty five. One of his ears had a torn lobe and that was there when I first met him fifteen years ago. I remembered him as a young man of  twenty five or  thirty,  fair complexioned by Indian standard with that unmistakable torn lobe on the lower portion of his left ear, the type of  deformity you occasionally found with women whose heavy  earring had been forcibly snatched away. I don’t remember how he got that. But I remembered some other things about him. He was a  vendor  selling boiled peas and grams by the side of the road passing in front of our school. There was a large banyan tree under which he sat. During the recess time students bought his boiled grams and peas. He used to take a  sal leaf and with a ladle he scooped up the boiled peas or grams, in the quantity and kind as desired by the student, on to the leaf and after  garnishing  it with some sliced onions, a few  coriander leaves and a dash of salt and pepper  he handed that over to the student who had ordered for that.

I was among the poorest of boys, so I could afford this luxury  only once in a week. But the way he served and did the whole operation from start to finish with his dexterous and agile hands never failed to intrigue or fascinate me. So I spent half of my recess time loitering around and watching him and his movements from a little distance. That one day in the week on which I could buy his wares was a very joyful day for me. The richer students probably could not have imagined that such paltry confectionary as boiled grams or peas could really mean  the moon to someone among their class mates.  Bhagwan might or might not have noticed my surveying him like that. He never offered anything free to anyone. I didn’t expect anything free from him either. It was a thing well understood from  childhood that  there was nothing free in this world. Either you paid in money and got something or you had none of that. You had better forget about that. There were no free lunches, not even free boiled peas. That was a fact of life, nothing to be bitter about. Nothing against Bhagwan, not even against your parents, you saw how hard they were in the midst of daily  battles for making a living for all of us. We were five brothers and four sisters; so my parents had even harder  battles to fight. I saw everything and understood everything and never demanded anything. Added to that I had to always live up to my image of Mom’s  good boy, her favorite, her pet.

While I was lost in reverie I noticed Bhagwan opening his eyes. He saw me but I found no sign of recognition. Probably the effects of the sleep had not completely worn off him. I went even nearer and stood beside him, introduced myself and asked him how he had been. Probably my voice did the trick or by then he was fully returned from the world of sleep. A look of comprehension and lucidity passed over his face and presently it was filled with a cherubic smile. He exclaimed in joy, ” Oh, you !” as he slowly rose up to sit on his bed. There was no seat to offer so he motioned me to sit on the bed itself. There was already the woman sitting on a corner of the bed. I politely refused but assured him that I was fine standing. He introduced the woman as his mother- in- law and I said Namaste to her. He introduced me to her with some glowing terms which I had never expected. I was a boy of eight  or ten years when we had last met  and he was perhaps twenty years older than me. I was just one boy among sixty or so students of the school and yet he remembered me in such vivid glowing terms was  remarkable for him.  I told the woman that her son-in-law was a good man and always lived by the sweat of his brow. He cheated nobody and all the children of the school liked him. The woman, whom Bhagwan called Mom  and a little while later I too called Mom, seemed to be pleased and smiled. At this moment the woman remembered something to be done and she excused herself away.

I asked Bhagwan what was he suffering from and how long he had been there in the hospital. He said while he was admitted to the hospital four days back he was incapable of urinating. He had great urge to urinate as his bladder was full, yet he could pass urine only in driblets. It took him half an hour to pass urine and when he finished it seemed it was incomplete, as if a lot remained inside. He was in great pain and thought he would die. With two or three men of his village he covered twenty kilometers in  bicycles, as that was the sole means of relatively rapid transport in our area, as a pillion rider in great discomfort and reached hospital in worst condition. He sent for his mother-in-law to remain by his side as his attendant. Only when she came in, the men from his village left him. The doctors first tried to make him urinate by administering  drugs but as he was not responding finally inserted a catheter or a tube of some length with small diameter  through his penis into his bladder and with a syringe drained the accumulated  urine out. Thereafter they performed some operations on him in that area and kept him in the hospital under observation. He slowly took off a fold of his cloth at the loin and showed me his penis with a tube hanging out. Suddenly I had the sensation that as if a bullet had passed through my chest and  I felt all my romantic notions of love, romance and sex drained out of me at the sight of that limp, flaccid penis with a catheter hanging out  of its tip. I felt excruciatingly uncomfortable. I was a young man of  twenty two  then and I had a lot of romantic illusions to grow out of. Bhagwan’s instrument of joy(my illusion no 1,if I may call that)or its pitiful condition, as it turned out, would soon  prove fatal for some of them. Strangely  after a little while as the uneasiness  passed away I felt overwhelmed with a surge of empathy and love towards him at his complete openness and display of unusual vulnerability. I felt a deep sense of protectiveness and compassion towards him and thought ways of being some use to him in his grim battle for survival. He was so week and exhausted that even this little effort of sitting and showing me his suffering had tired him out. I told him to lie down and he obeyed. I could see the heavy tolls of the passing years and this unfortunate illness had taken on him.

His mother-in-law had returned to his bed. I was wondering why didn’t I think of connecting Bhagwan with a family of his own during the time I read in school and enjoyed his wares as the world’s number one delicacy. I had never thought that even the street vendors, the lowest of the lows, had a life and family of their own to which they returned at the end of the day with day’s earnings. Now I knew better. The sight of  his mother -in-law  prompted me to wonder about his wife and children. I thought to ask about them later. I promised him to visit him next day too and took leave of them and returned to my hostel. I was doing my final year of graduation in a nearby college.

That night I awoke from my sleep in the middle of  a nightmare. A catheter  was being inserted through my penis  through the urethra to the bladder. I was  in excruciating pain and wondering how did they think of inserting that pipe into that almost nonexistent fine hole which was only meant to accommodate some passing fluids. How could they not feel my pain? Why did they not give some anesthesia  before inserting that cruel pipe? I woke up as the pain became unbearable and saw that nobody was there in my room. I was only seeing a dream. I thought of  poor Bhagwan for whom it was not a dream, it was real. For the last four days he has been bearing that pipe in his most sensitive part of the body and depended on doctors and nurses for as simple a thing as urinating. I wept for him and prayed God to bless  and cure him soon. I went back to sleep, fortunately, again with tears in my eyes.

In the morning as I awoke I  was filled with a great desire to visit him  as soon as possible. I prepared myself for classes and as the last class was over I returned to the hostel, took my meal and straight went to the hospital to visit Bhagwan. He looked a little better and said he could now urinate without the help of doctors or nurses, though the urine passed through the pipe a bit slowly. The doctors had advised  him to continue with the medicines as he was now responding well. This time his mother-in-law insisted on me  to sit with them on the bed itself and she offered to stand  herself as she said she needed some movements too as she was not a patient. I thought  she was cheerful  or as cheerful as one could be in the situation she was in. I complied by sitting on the bed. She left us to ourselves and went for a stroll in the hospital corridor. This time I could not contain my curiosity any longer. I asked Bhagwan why his wife was not with him. He was reclining on the bed with one end of the bed raised under his head, supporting his head comfortably. I felt a certain sadness enveloped his face at my question. He said he had lost his wife a decade back. To that I expressed my surprise. I expressed my desire to listen about his wife and her death.

I  could clearly see he became an altogether different man as he narrated his story. His face gradually lost his senility and he looked much younger, even younger than his actual age. It was largely a happy story with a sad ending, as if  with a sting in the tail. Theirs was a fairy tale like marriage and like most Indian marriages arranged by the elders. Both were young  and they fell in love instaneously. Their chemistry and vives were great. The newly wedded girl loved her husband like a god. She never ever  ate or slept before him. His every wish was like a command for her and she would always try to fulfill that. She would cook only those things that he liked. He could never know what she liked. She would only be pleased by feeding him the food he liked and the way he liked. That woman had a strange habit of  receiving  joy and happiness only by giving them  to her husband. She wanted nothing, demanded nothing for herself. When he offered her money to buy things for herself she always  smiled and promised him to buy something for herself next time but never bought anything for herself. Not even a  jewelry piece so fond of by other women of the village. At the slightest hint of his need for money she always gave back his money, not a penny spent on herself. Her sole mission on earth consisted of only pleasing her lord, her husband. She never compared her husband with anybody, however high, rich and mighty he might be. Riches, gold, money never counted much in her eyes. Her  roadside vendor husband, to her, was  a king by himself. No king ever matched him in his glory, in her eyes. He could do no wrong whatsoever. Her loyalty to him was cent per cent. Service to her lord was her only worship, only puja, she worshipped no other god. She would be the last to sleep and first to wake up lest her lord wanted something of her in the morning. She would be there in all his needs. Once he fell ill  and she served him day and night and nursed him back to health within short time. During nights  in the village, where no house had latrine or bathroom inside the house and everyone including the women went outside to urinate or defecate, she would accompany him in all his nightly excursions  and  with a torch in her hand she would select and inspect the spot her lord would use for his  evacuation jobs, lest some lurking snake or scorpion in the grass bite or sting him. To this unusual and extraordinary woman Bhagwan had the good or bad fortune to marry and now as he narrated all these he was finding it difficult to hold back his tears. Bad fortune because his wife died only within five years of their marriage. During these five years she had never left her husband even for a day. She died of cholera in his village in one outbreak which claimed ten lives including hers. They had no children. He was inconsolable, disoriented for a while. Later he gathered himself up and went out to the street for vending. She had requested him not to scatter himself away, not to despair, not to commit any foolish acts like suicide but to hold his head high and begin again from the scratch; that was to marry again. But Bhagwan  did not remarry, how could he find a wife like her ?Nothing less than her would satisfy him, for he had  now  known what love was. She was not only the best wife any man had ever had but she was also his greatest teacher too. She taught him how to love and how to die loving.

Bhagwan was now openly weeping for his dear wife who had departed a decade back. He wanted  to have a pee  after  this long narration and I offered to accompany him to the bath room. But surprisingly he refused my offer and instead insisted on me to sit there and look after his things. He said too many varieties of people came to hospitals and nobody should leave his things, money etc. unattended. He assured me he would be right back soon and marched away like a young man. Probably the talk about his dear wife had charged him with fresh vigor and energy.

No sooner had he  gone his mother-in-law returned and finding  him not there asked me about him. I told her not to worry as he had gone for a pee. She looked at me askingly, with questions in her eyes and surprised. I told her it was as per his wishes, he  felt strong enough to  do the job unassisted. I also said that she could expect an early discharge from the hospital as Bhagwan  had recovered surprisingly. She was happy to hear the news as she wanted to be back in her village as soon as possible. On a sudden impulse I  asked her, ” Mom, your daughter had died a decade back. Yet  you came here to attend him in his hour of need. Ten years is a long time to forget any son-in-law  when your daughter  is not there to keep the relation alive. Most people would have found this kind of request,  for attending their ex- son-in-law in hospital,  preposterous and yet you conceded  to his request. Will you kindly tell me what made you come here and attend him single handedly and unassisted by anybody else for the last four days?”

What she said in reply would remain in my memory till I die. To me it was as mysterious as the universe itself. They say you cannot explain a mystery, you can only live it. Well, ever since I had heard her reply I have been living a mystery. I have not been able to solve it. So I am just quoting her reply in verbatim so that greater heads than myself would have a go at it to crack it. First she wept a little and then said, “This man Bhagwan is not as simple as he looks. He harassed and tortured my daughter a great deal. Still she loved him  much for reasons best known to her. In her place nobody could have tolerated him. But she never let us utter a word against him. She even threatened to cut off all relationship with us, her  own parents whom she dearly loved, if we proceeded to harm him in anyway. So we remained shut up. Later she died. Her death was unexpected and unfortunate. It was devastating for all of us. We lost our dear daughter.  Bhagwan never remarried thereafter. We forgave and accepted him as our son and even tried to make him agree to remarry, but he won’t. So when he sent us message to come and take charge of him in the hospital, how could I say no to him. I have left my husband, an old man, in village all by himself  to come here. How he is cooking for himself I don’t know. He has never cooked in his life. So my mind is with him too while my body is here. If I didn’t come here then who would have? Bhagwan has no one else to nurse him, to look after him. I am just doing my duty”.

Somehow I could not associate Bhagwan with harassing or torturing his dear wife. Probably her self- sacrificing love for him was misunderstood by her  loving mother as perpetration of tyranny over her. I didn’t know nor I would ever know. Didn’t I say something remained as mystery, never to be solved. Within a day or two Bhagwan was to be discharged from the hospital. Thereafter we were never  to meet  again. But I was wondering how love was manifesting in peoples’ lives and prompted them to behave in the ways never imagined by themselves before. So many forms of love, so many appearances rising in love.

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      Steven Steensels

       

      Oh yes, Paresh, the ways we relate to and love other creatures are indeed a mystery. Thank you for sharing your inquisitive feelings, so deep and sensitive…
      Have you read ‘Eleven Past Lives’ among my notes ? A similar experience: wonder wi…See More
      August 27 at 6:32pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Picky Curmudgeon

       

      Paresh….. Thank you for this. Your stories point out the great meaning that exists within our everyday experiences. You have a sensitivity that appreciates meaning where others would not see it.
      A collection of your stories in the form of …See More
      August 27 at 7:37pm · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Jill Richling-Thesman Wonderful, Presh. I was moved and entranced from the first paragraph till the last. Thank you. 

       

      August 27 at 8:17pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Adriana Hill Oh, did I forget to mention that Paresh is going to publish? Stay tuned for more to come..it gets better with each installation! 

       

      August 27 at 8:19pm · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Unity Walker Paresh–Your stories are from the heart–your own experience. They say we should write about what is familiar to us. You are obviously familiar with the heart. Namaste. ~♥~ 

       

      August 27 at 8:42pm · Unlike ·  6 people
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      Robin Zak ‎”They say you cannot explain a mystery, you can only live it.”…lovely truth, and an enchanting story which enhances the “… many forms of love, so many appearances rising in love.” Thank you Paresh 

       

      August 27 at 8:48pm · Unlike ·  5 people
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      Elena Bourunina If you live your lives on the basis of what you believ, what you love in your heart- it means to be truly human and it is the way of living in the wisdom of God. Paresh, great thanks for sharing! 

       

      August 27 at 9:28pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Miriam Strauss

       

      Compassion has the capacity to remove the suffering of others without expecting anything in return.
      Practice sympathetic joy to overcome hatred. Sympathetic joy arises when one rejoices over the happiness of others and wishes others well-be…See More
      August 27 at 10:04pm · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Kia Pierce Dear Paresh, I very much enjoyed and was moved by your story ~ thank you. Life and love are a sacred mystery indeed, and on occasion time serves to illuminate glimpses of unexpected realities behind the veil. Very grateful for your sharings, and for the tag. Thank you. ♥ 

       

      August 27 at 11:46pm · Unlike ·  6 people
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      Irene Bradle What a wonderful story, Paresh. The workings of the heart will always remain a mystery. Love is given and recieved in so many different ways. Everyone has a different perception of what love entails. Your love, my dear friend, is filled with compassion, the greatest element the heart can hold. I am very elated that your works will be published. Thank You, as always, for sharing. Namaste! 

       

      August 28 at 12:46am · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Hélène Lalaire ♥ Thank you dear Heart 

       

      August 28 at 2:21am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Elaine Mouton Flanagan Thank you 

       

      August 28 at 4:21am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Beatriz Dantzler You are such a talented and sensitive writer, dear Paresh. Very beautiful story! Thank you! ♥ 

       

      August 28 at 6:10am · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Neelam Sethi Pareshji, ur story asks us to be grateful for one of nature’s greatest blessings- good health. Secondly, it brings to light the fact that the good that people do lives after them and it is human nature to think of the past as very very good, even tho’ it wasn’t so.And, thirdly, we find that even the poor are cultured enough to feel duty bound to a relationship which is really no more. Thanx, very touching story. 

       

      August 28 at 11:30am · Unlike ·  4 people
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      Ishvari Lockhart Thank you dear Paresh, you fill your words with Love ♥ 

       

      August 28 at 2:23pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Richard Kogerup Thank you dear Paresh , your stories fill my heart with love … Just Beautiful … 

       

      August 28 at 9:13pm · Unlike ·  2 people
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      Daniel D. Woo Paresh: This is a beautiful story. Thank you. 

       

      August 29 at 6:13am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Kaila Kukla love is given equally to everybody whether rich or poor…why not? God is Love and we are all his heart 

       

      August 29 at 8:39am · Unlike ·  3 people
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      Carmen Pentek

       

      Dear Paresh, you are a very gifted short-story writer, please continue! 

       

      The narration about the loving wife reminded me a lot of my mother who tolerated a great deal of my father’s difficult behaviours…
      I think in her case it had to do with…See More

      August 30 at 4:54am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Julia Day Selfless service ~ to go where we are Called ~ beautiful ♥ 

       

      August 30 at 9:52pm · Like ·  1 person
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      Carmen Pentek Obedience needs no intelligence. All machines are obedient. Nobody has ever heard of a disobedient machine. Obedience is simple, too. It takes the burden off you of any responsibility. There is no need to react, you have simply to do what is being said. The responsibility rests with the source from where the ord…er comes. In a certain way you are very free: you cannot be condemned for your act. OSHO 

       

      August 30 at 10:58pm · Like
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      Irene Harvey

       

      interesting. when reading the part of the story about the seemingly selfless acts of the wife, i immediately grew suspicious. it seemed pathological to me. no one is anyone’s god. why was she behaving like a doormat? real love is possible o…See More
      August 31 at 5:33am · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj

       

      Neelam,Carmen,Julia and Irene,You have raised very good points of your own after reading the story.They are your genuine responses.They also show the story engaged you at some deeper level and moved you to record your insights,interpretatio…See More
      August 31 at 6:21am · Like ·  1 person
    •  

      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj

       

      I might add here that but for this spectacle of selfless love I would not have been moved to write this story at all.Of course,what is perceived as selfless love by someone can be perceived as sentimental or machine like behavior by somebo…See More
      August 31 at 7:41am · Like ·  3 people
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      Nana Trianasari Thank you so much Pareshji, for tagging & sharing..it’s such an inspiring story…Thank you… 

       

      August 31 at 9:03am · Unlike ·  2 people
    •  

      Renee Knight Wow, what a story! 

       

      October 5 at 2:38am · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Paresh Chandra Mangaraj Renee,thank you for reading my story.I could not be as courteous,civil and humble as yourself always.But in my own way I have tried to offer my genuine respect to a rustic woman who symbolised for me selfless unconditional love.As my friend,philosopher and guide Julia Day very aptly described it as “Selfless service ~to go wherever we are called”.I am moved to accord you a very special welcome to you here. 

       

      October 5 at 8:11am · Like ·  1 person
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      Renee Knight Yes, that is what I felt when reading the story. Namaskar, Rani 

       

      October 5 at 6:31pm · Unlike ·  1 person
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      Oriah Myriah Rohr wow ! …” ‘rising in love’, so many forms” ♥ 

       

      October 7 at 10:25pm · Unlike ·  1 person